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Financing the EUs recovery: Increased budget ceiling and (new) EU revenues

August 5, 2020
Region:
The EUR 750 bn recovery package agreed upon by EU leaders two weeks ago will be financed through EU borrowing while the EUR 1,074 bn budget for the next seven years mainly depends on EU members' direct contributions. For the Commission to tap markets, the own resources ceiling – i.e. the maximum amount that can be called per year to finance EU expenditure – will be temporarily increased from the current 1.2% to 2% of EU members’ GNI. The Council committed itself to reform the EU’s financing system and plans to introduce new own resources for early repayment of EU borrowing. The top priority at present is swift adoption of the budget and recovery fund to address the consequences of the pandemic over the coming years. Following agreement in the Council, the MFF 2021-2027 now requires the consent of the European Parliament, in an absolute-majority vote. The decision about own resources – EU borrowing, increased ceiling and new own resources – needs to be approved by all member states in accordance with their constitutional requirements (including approval by national parliaments). While we do not expect an overall blockage of the package by the European Parliament or member states, delays cannot be excluded. [more]

More documents contained in "EU Monitor"

98 (97-98)
April 22, 2008
Region:
97
Recent market turmoil and its consequences will negatively impact the earnings of European banks for a considerable time. This reverses a long period of improvements in profitability and efficiency. But: the current environment should not distract from the trends that have favourably shaped the structure of the industry for the last 10 years and will continue to do so: consolidation, internationalisation, convergence and increasing specialisation. In this study, we consider to what extent these trends are going to further shape the banking sector in the foreseeable future. [more]
June 16, 2006
Region:
98
Neither theory nor empirical observations can justify an interventionist industrial policy. Under the euphemism of economic patriotism, a policy based mainly on protectionist measures and state support will ultimately harm the competitiveness of affected industries. Such an approach threatens the viability of the single European market. A more promising alternative would be an economic policy that offers growth-enhancing framework conditions to create an attractive environment for domestic firms and foreign investors alike. [more]
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