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The House View : Mixed signals

June 28, 2017
Global investors have recently been forced to sift through mixed signals from macro data and markets. Chief among these discordant messages is the apparent dichotomy between softer inflation, lower yields and flatter curves, and falling oil prices on the one hand, and still solid global growth and firm risk sentiment on the other hand. We remain generally optimistic in our global macro outlook despite these mixed signals. Supply-side factors, rather than a weaker demand outlook, underpin the fall in oil prices, and this is positive for growth for oil importers. The softening core inflation trend is due primarily to temporary factors, particularly in the US, and the uptrend should resume given the solid growth momentum.Indeed, our global growth outlook is little changed since the start of the year. We marked down US growth on lower odds of Trump’s policy agenda, but still expect deregulation and modest fiscal stimulus to support above-trend growth. This downgrade is compensated by upgrades to eurozone and China growth. Our market views largely reflect this overall constructive tone: we are not concerned about the discordance between firming risk assets and falling rates; the normalisation of US and Europe rates should resume in coming months. In FX we have turned more positive on the euro but stay bearish sterling. Our base case that political risk would not escalate is playing out. Moreover, the intervention to resolve ailing banks in Veneto is positive and lowers risk in Italy. The exception, as expected, is the UK, where the outcome of Brexit has become more binary: the risk of a soft Brexit has risen, but so has that of a crash Brexit. David Folkerts-Landau, Group Chief Economist Key pages this month: P6 Mixed signals P8 Oil less a concern for risk assets P11 Flat US yield curve but low risk of recession P17 Europe political risk not materialising P23 Limited scope for further oil weaknessYou can access a two-page update of Deutsche Bank Research's views on g [more]

More documents from Matthew Luzzetti

16 Documents
May 13, 2020
1
After shrugging off a historic plunge in April employment, market participants will likely need to digest further record-setting monthly declines in core CPI inflation as well as April retail sales and industrial production. However, with financial markets seemingly numb to the bad data news, Fed Chair Powell's appearance on Wednesday may overshadow what is likely to be epic weakness in this week's economic data. [more]
May 12, 2020
2
After shrugging off a historic plunge in April employment, market participants will likely need to digest further record-setting monthly declines in core CPI inflation as well as April retail sales and industrial production. However, with financial markets seemingly numb to the bad data news, Fed Chair Powell's appearance on Wednesday may overshadow what is likely to be epic weakness in this week's economic data. Matthew Luzzetti, Chief US Economist shares his insights. [more]
March 14, 2018
10
Robust, broad-based global expansion. Synchronised growth across regions and economies, in many cases at above-trend levels. We expect global growth to accelerate to +3.9% this year, marginally above 2017, as fundamentals remain supportive. We expect the US and eurozone to continue growing above potential, but do not anticipate any further acceleration. In China, we expect growth to slow, and are more worried about inflation and financial risks than consensus. 2018 should mark the peak of the current cyclical expansion; growth should decelerate from 2019. [more]
March 7, 2018
11
Inflation data over the past year – and especially over the past week – have highlighted a critical point. Fluctuations in inflation rates for items that are typically insensitive to the busi-ness cycle — which we refer to as acyclical, such as health care and apparel — can drive the overall inflation trajectory and lead to regime shifts in the market’s inflation narrative. The plunge in wireless telephone services prices last March, followed by a string of downside surprises to other acyclical items, spawned a narrative that structural disinflationary forces would prevent inflation from rising. In the same way, recent stronger inflation data led by acyclical items may have revived the narrative that the Phillips curve is, in fact, alive and well and that risks are tilted toward inflation overshooting the Fed’s target. [more]
February 7, 2018
12
After a stellar 2017 and an even stronger January, risk assets have undergone a sharp pullback in the last week. Initially triggered by higher rates as markets repriced inflation expectations higher, the episode evolved into a technical spout of volatility exacerbated by programmatic strategies. The pullback is healthy, after a highly unusual stretch of market tranquility. [more]
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