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Extraordinary semiconductor cycle triggered by one-time events, cyclical and geopolitical effects

May 5, 2022
Region:
In 2021, global sales in the semiconductor industry reached an all-time high of USD 556 bn. Despite this record figure, the industry currently faces severe challenges as the present semiconductor cycle is characterized by a triple whammy: Huge demand due to a boost for digitalization, COVID-related and non-COVID related supply shortages and geopolitical tensions. Due to the sharp rise in chip demand, new chip factories are currently being built in the US, Asia and Europe to meet rising demand over the next decade. We think, the present sales cycle will be extraordinary long. [more]

More documents about "Germany"

358 Documents
June 22, 2022
Region:
2
After two years in the virtual world Deutsche Bank Research returned to Paris to host another highly successful Global Consumer Conference. Around 700 people and including 90 companies, attended over the three days of the conference. Company and investor engagement was extremely high with more than 7,000 meeting requests. Tom Sykes, Head of European Consumer Staples and Stephen Powers, Head of US Consumer Staples, co-hosts of the event, said: “Feedback has been very positive from the companies and investment communities and we look forward to seeing everybody again in Paris in 2023 for our celebratory 20th year!” [more]
May 20, 2022
Region:
4
In this edition of Focus Germany we look at the cyclical, short-term challenges brought about by the Ukraine war with regard to growth, inflation and public finances. We also analyse the more structural longer-term challenges, such as reducing the countries’ energy dependence on Russia and the governing coalition’s efforts to integrate new priorities precipitated by the historic watershed into its already very ambitious agenda. [more]
May 10, 2022
Region:
5
We expect the German residential property market cycle to come to an end during the current decade. A combination of our different approaches suggests that, despite the uncertainties, the cycle will probably end in 2024. Prices will not necessarily undergo a massive correction from their peak, our baseline scenario foresees an isolated ending of the cycle. As migration inflows were low and new construction activity has been dynamic during the pandemic, fundamental supply shortages are a thing of the past for many German cities. The current refugee wave will only temporarily weigh on the market. [more]
March 25, 2022
Region:
Analyst:
6
Despite many years of expansion of renewable energies, Germany is – as most other industrialised countries in the world are – still dependent on fossil fuels. Germany imports close to 70% of its energy resources with Russia currently the most important supplier of fossil fuels. Germany aims to reduce its dependency on energy imports from Russia as fast as possible and plans to massively expand renewable energies but will also invest in LNG infrastructure to diversify gas supply. The short-term risk of being cut off from Russian gas and oil supply is more pronounced in the heating market and less severe in the electricity sector. A faster expansion of renewables is a consequence of the current energy crisis, but no short-term solution given limitations on the supply side. [more]
March 4, 2022
Region:
7
War in Ukraine – slowing but not ending the German recovery. In a moderate economic scenario (which is our new baseline forecast) we expect German GDP to grow by between 2 ½% and 3% (old forecast 4%). Surging energy prices should push the annual inflation rate to around 5 ½% in 2022. Government spending is expected to be ramped up by 1 ¼ and 1 ½ pp, limiting the overall growth loss. In a more severe scenario headline inflation could rise to between 6 ½% and 7%, as oil and gas deliveries are at least temporarily halted. Annual GDP growth should be a meagre 1% to 1 ½%. [more]
February 21, 2022
Region:
8
James Brand, Head of European Utility Research discusses with Debbie Jones, Global Head of ESG Company Research the ambitious targets set by Germany's coalition government, arguably Europe's most ambitious decarbonisation targets. The targets aims to transform Germany's power market, reaching 80% renewable generation by 2030 while closing its remaining nuclear plants and phasing out coal. It could put Germany at the forefront of the energy transition. [more]
February 21, 2022
Region:
9
James Brand, Head of European Utility Research has just published a new report discussing the ambitious targets set by Germany's coalition government, arguably Europe's most ambitious decarbonisation targets. The targets aims to transform Germany's power market, reaching 80% renewable generation by 2030 while closing its remaining nuclear plants and phasing out coal and could put Germany at the forefront of the energy transition. He uses an hourly German power market model to analyse how its targeted mix can adapt to the biggest challenges of energy transition: renewable intermittency and demand seasonality. [more]
January 26, 2022
Region:
11
Due to significant demand/supply imbalances as well as climate policy measures, energy prices were the main driver of consumer price inflation in Germany in 2021. In 2022 as a whole, prices might increase by more than 20% for gas on average and by more than 15% for electricity. In that case, higher gas and electricity prices would substantially boost Germany’s inflation rate in 2022 (by up to 1 percentage point). In the medium term, a more ambitious climate and energy policy will very likely continue to raise consumer price inflation. At least over the transition period, rising CO2 prices (via the national carbon levy or the EU-wide emissions trading system) will not only lead to a permanently higher price trend for fossil fuels (oil/gas heating, fuels) but also costs for electricity generation. Overall, this weakens the widespread argument to view energy price increases as temporary. [more]
December 22, 2021
Region:
12
It is, once again, the season of the year when not only are we preparing for Christmas holidays and starting to think about new year resolutions, but economic forecasters are also offering their outlooks for the upcoming year. However, the last two years should have convinced even the most stubborn hedgehog that there is far less predictability, let alone certainty, around us than we like to believe. In particular, problems resulting from “system complexity” are, in our view, not sufficiently appreciated by forecasters and the recipients of these forecasts, alike. The critical assumptions, nota bene assumptions not predictions, driving – to a large extent – GDP and inflation forecasts for the next one or two years, are the future development of the COVID-19 pandemic and the – hoped for – gradual easing of supply bottlenecks, both almost textbook examples of system complexity. So are, probably, the Philips curve models used to forecast inflation. Let’s face it, believing in inflation forecasts with exact numbers, even behind the decimal point, for several years out, is little different to believing in Santa Claus. [more]
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