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Stefan Bergheim

See more on "Macroeconomics"
7 Documents
October 2, 2008
Region:
1
Gross domestic product is less and less often used as the sole measure of a country's progress. Broader measures of wellbeing are moving centre-stage. Many theories of societal progress use similar variables, which tend to develop hand in hand: life satisfaction, freedom, trust, education, income, employment, government effectiveness, the quality of democracy, corruption reduction, tolerance, participation and innovation. While Scandinavian countries are in the lead in many aspects, Germany has room for improvement, particularly in terms of education, employment, government effectiveness, corruption and the quality of democracy. To achieve sustainable progress all sectors of society must be involved: federal, state and municipal policy-makers, businesses and individual citizens. [more]
February 14, 2008
2
After four years of above-average growth the global economy is clearly slowing down. The US housing recession and high oil prices are dampening global economic growth, even though the substantial USD depreciation of the last two years, decisive and timely Fed action and the USD 150 bn fiscal package will prevent a US recession. Due to robust domestic demand and solid current account surpluses in many cases the emerging markets – contrary to previous shocks – are providing an element of stabilisation. Europe will be affected by the US slowdown with a lag while the strong currency continues to be a drag. [more]
January 7, 2008
Region:
3
Happy regions in Germany share many things in common: they all score well not only in terms of life satisfaction, but also with regard to trust in fellow citizens, state of health, unemployment, birth rate and income. This is in line with DB Research’s analysis at country level. The regions of Donau-Iller, Ostwuerttemberg, Osnabrueck and Hamburg-Umland-Sued achieve particularly good scores. There are no urban agglomerations in the uppermost ranks, though. The east German regions bring up the rear in this ranking. Our analysis suggests that well-being can be shaped and fostered on a regional/decentralised basis with a comprehensive policy approach. [more]
April 25, 2007
4
Countries with a high level of material prosperity are faced with the question of which priorities to set for the future and which objectives to target with their reform processes. One objective could be the happy variety of capitalism, which can be identified using the insights of happiness research. Countries of the happy variety are currently Australia, Switzerland, Canada, the UK, the US, Denmark, Sweden, Norway and the Netherlands. They are characterised by an array of commonalities such as low unemployment, a high education level, a high employment rate of older people and extensive economic freedom. [more]
March 20, 2006
5
Life expectancy and health spending have been increasing for decades the world over. This life extension trend is an important engine of growth: investment in education brings higher returns; lower mortality raises population growth. However, the speed and impact of the trend cluster are still underestimated: forecasts of life expectancy and the size of the health sector are probably still too low - making the need for adjustment in the political and business community greater than many people have thought. [more]
August 1, 2005
6
Human capital is the most important factor of production in today's economies - and education is an investment that generates higher incomes in future. The growth stars of the coming years identified in our introductory study base their success on major gains in human capital. The success stories of Spain and South Korea show that political changes can have a lasting impact on human capital. [more]
March 23, 2005
7
Substantiated, long-run growth forecasts are in the limelight following the New Economy disappointments and repeated crises in the emerging markets. With the help of "Formel-G", we identify the sources of economic long-term growth and generate forecasts for 34 economies until 2020. India, Malaysia and China will post the highest GDP growth rates over 2006-20 according to our "Formel-G" approach. Strong population growth, a rapid improvement in human capital and increasing trade with other countries allow average GDP growth of more than 5% per year in these three countries. Ireland, the USA and Spain are the OECD economies expected to grow most quickly. [more]
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