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Germany

Germany has recovered well from the global financial and euro crisis. To make sure that the future challenges are successfully addressed, a balance between sustainable growth and social participation are essential. To achieve these objectives further reforms are needed as well as an improvement of the macroeconomic framework. Policymakers, businesspeople and the public must face up to their responsibilities. DB Research analyses the economic and political conflicting ideas and incorporates possible solutions into economic and political outlooks. These are based on national sector research, global business cycle and financial forecasts as well as the assessment of international political developments.

408 (31-40)
April 21, 2023
Region:
The boom is over. Five key arguments lead us to expect only a price dip. Negative real interest rates, inflation protection through real estate, rising rental growth and most importantly a high fundamental supply shortage. In addition, real house prices have already fallen very sharply due to the surge in inflation. CO2 emissions from buildings are increasingly coming into focus. Prices have started to diverge between properties with low and high emissions. This divergence is likely to increase. [more]
33
March 31, 2023
Region:
In the first edition of our Energy Transition Monitor, we take stock of the current speed of renewables rollout, e-car uptake, heat-pump installations, and energy infrastructure build-up (e.g., regarding hydrogen) in Germany. We then analyse existing bottlenecks for reaching envisaged targets for 2030. Finally, we provide an update of current policy action aimed at mitigating those bottlenecks, both at the EU and national level, and potential implications of these policy measures on investment spending (private and public). [more]
34
March 9, 2023
Region:
The German economy – one year after. With surprisingly strong hard data for January, chances are rising that GDP might be saved from another decline in Q1. Although not yet our baseline call, this would prevent Germany from going through a technical recession. However, still heightened uncertainty and real income losses due to high inflation will likely keep investment spending and private consumption flatlining in the first half of the year. Hence, we maintain our 0% forecast for 2023 German GDP growth, although upside risks have increased since the start of the year. [more]
35
March 1, 2023
Region:
We calculate a nominal and real return triangle for German house prices from 1970 to 2022. The market offered an inflation hedge in the past. This is in particular true for periods of high inflation as in these periods house prices even exceeded inflation. The huge supply shortage and rising rents are further arguments for a bottoming out of house prices in 2023. [more]
37
February 17, 2023
Region:
With our new German Economic Chartbook, we take the pulse of the German economy, both from a cyclical and a structural perspective. What better time for its launch than the upward revision to our 2023 forecast. We now expect only a mild technical recession in the winter half-year, so annual GDP should move sideways rather than contract. The abating energy price shock has also prompted a downward revision to our inflation forecast, although we remain concerned about wage dynamics and their impact on core inflation, given the increasingly structural tightness in the labour market. Still, the resulting loss of real purchasing power will prevent private consumption from boosting growth as its did in 2022, when the normalisation of the savings rate more than offset the decline in real disposable income. [more]
38
December 19, 2022
Region:
We look at the expected recession in the winter half-year 2022/23 and the onset of recovery, how inflation will peak, while the labor market loses momentum and private consumption is hit by the loss of purchasing power. Construction and Capex spending are set to deteriorate. Fiscal policy continues to lean against the headwinds but should normalize somewhat. Loan growth, both with corporates and private households, may slow substantially. In a medium-term perspective, we discuss risks for the manufacturing industry and Germany’s geopolitical and competitive position. [more]
39
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