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Stefan Schneider

More documents written by Stefan Schneider

129 Documents
December 8, 2023
Region:
2
The external environment as well as monetary and fiscal policy should provide strong headwinds. Sentiment will likely be dragged lower by the increasingly evident structural problems. We anticipate a modest recession during the winter half to be followed by a gradual recovery from spring onwards. We expect the government to survive the internal quarrels with respect to the 2024 budget, following the constitutional court ruling. Debt brake reform is unlikely in the short run. A cross-party consensus for a Transformation Fund 2.0 might emerge before September regional elections. [more]
October 13, 2023
Region:
4
A double-dip recession. Hard and soft data point to a GDP contraction of about 0.3% in Q3. Despite receding inflation,we expect that private consumption will only gradually come out of its rut, as consumer confidence has remained depressed. While the overall decline in GDP over the double-dip recession (Q4 22/Q1 23 and Q3 23) will probably be less than 1 percentage point, a renewed fall in GDP provides another blow to already downbeat German confidence. This negative feedback loop will likely weigh on the economy in 2024. In particular, structural supply bottlenecks look set to hamper growth opportunities and the energy transition is likely to slow potential growth in Germany towards 0.5% and keep the inflation rate above 2%. [more]
September 1, 2023
Region:
5
Back to school with a new edition of the "Germany: Economic Chartbook".
Given the deterioration of sentiment as well as other high-frequency data, and the current and looming global headwinds, we have lowered our 2023 and 2024 GDP forecasts. While inflation is moving in the right direction, leading labor market indicators point to first cracks, even though skilled workers are still in high demand. However, private consumption is weak, and the latest consumer sentiment surveys do not suggest an imminent upswing. We take a closer look at the development of wages and household finances. Higher interest rates and a low propensity to invest have slowed lending to companies. Finally, we also look at the fiscal budget, a German green trade surplus and the office market. With a more long-term perspective, we illustrate Germany's structural challenges. [more]
July 25, 2023
Region:
6
Germany’s growth is under pressure from renewed cyclical and structural headwinds. In this edition of Focus Germany we introduce our new Nowcast Model for German GDP, predicting that the German economy should have expanded in Q2, but that risks for activity in H2 are increasing. We take the summer break in Berlin as an opportunity for a midterm review of the traffic-light coalition’s work. In a historic flashback we revisit the challenges Germany was facing when the Economist called it the sick man of the euro and which policy measures transformed the country into an Economic superstar a decade later. We find interesting parallels to today’s situation. [more]
May 26, 2023
Region:
7
With Q1 GDP growth revised to -0.3% we now expect annual GDP to shrink by 0.3% in 2023. With the expected US recession weighing on German economic momentum towards year end we have cut our annual forecast for GDP growth in 2024 to 0.5% from 1.0%. Meanwhile, the energy transition policy is putting strains on government cohesion, as can be seen from the failure to agree on a piece of climate legislation this week. Spending pressures and debt-brake limits add to tensions. Still, none of the three ruling parties has an incentive to trigger early elections. [more]
May 11, 2023
Region:
8
The new edition of our Germany: Economic Chartbook provides an overview of key data on current economic developments. The winter dip in the German economy has not been as severe as feared. Nevertheless, the picture at the current margin is rather divergent. While headline inflation is likely to subside further, core inflation might prove sticky. Private household demand is still under pressure, despite strong inflation-related one-off payments. Corporate lending slows after a long boom. Overall, we expect only a shallow recovery for the rest of the year, so German GDP is likely to stagnate on average in 2023. Last but not least, we also update you on our recent thematic research on the German housing market, progress with the energy transition and the German position on the recent EU fiscal rules proposal. [more]
March 9, 2023
Region:
9
The German economy – one year after. With surprisingly strong hard data for January, chances are rising that GDP might be saved from another decline in Q1. Although not yet our baseline call, this would prevent Germany from going through a technical recession. However, still heightened uncertainty and real income losses due to high inflation will likely keep investment spending and private consumption flatlining in the first half of the year. Hence, we maintain our 0% forecast for 2023 German GDP growth, although upside risks have increased since the start of the year. [more]
February 17, 2023
Region:
10
With our new German Economic Chartbook, we take the pulse of the German economy, both from a cyclical and a structural perspective. What better time for its launch than the upward revision to our 2023 forecast. We now expect only a mild technical recession in the winter half-year, so annual GDP should move sideways rather than contract. The abating energy price shock has also prompted a downward revision to our inflation forecast, although we remain concerned about wage dynamics and their impact on core inflation, given the increasingly structural tightness in the labour market. Still, the resulting loss of real purchasing power will prevent private consumption from boosting growth as its did in 2022, when the normalisation of the savings rate more than offset the decline in real disposable income. [more]
December 19, 2022
Region:
11
We look at the expected recession in the winter half-year 2022/23 and the onset of recovery, how inflation will peak, while the labor market loses momentum and private consumption is hit by the loss of purchasing power. Construction and Capex spending are set to deteriorate. Fiscal policy continues to lean against the headwinds but should normalize somewhat. Loan growth, both with corporates and private households, may slow substantially. In a medium-term perspective, we discuss risks for the manufacturing industry and Germany’s geopolitical and competitive position. [more]
November 22, 2022
Region:
12
GDP: Lower risk of gas shortages but real income shock will bite. Fully replenished gas storages and the larger than expected fiscal support for households suggest that the recession will not be as deep as expected a few weeks ago, although private households will have to cope with a real income shock. [more]
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