1. Research
  2. Products & Topics
  3. Periodicals
  4. The House View Snapshot

The House View : Mixed signals

June 28, 2017
Global investors have recently been forced to sift through mixed signals from macro data and markets. Chief among these discordant messages is the apparent dichotomy between softer inflation, lower yields and flatter curves, and falling oil prices on the one hand, and still solid global growth and firm risk sentiment on the other hand. We remain generally optimistic in our global macro outlook despite these mixed signals. Supply-side factors, rather than a weaker demand outlook, underpin the fall in oil prices, and this is positive for growth for oil importers. The softening core inflation trend is due primarily to temporary factors, particularly in the US, and the uptrend should resume given the solid growth momentum. Indeed, our global growth outlook is little changed since the start of the year. We marked down US growth on lower odds of Trump’s policy agenda, but still expect deregulation and modest fiscal stimulus to support above-trend growth. This downgrade is compensated by upgrades to eurozone and China growth. Our market views largely reflect this overall constructive tone: we are not concerned about the discordance between firming risk assets and falling rates; the normalisation of US and Europe rates should resume in coming months. In FX we have turned more positive on the euro but stay bearish sterling. Our base case that political risk would not escalate is playing out. Moreover, the intervention to resolve ailing banks in Veneto is positive and lowers risk in Italy. The exception, as expected, is the UK, where the outcome of Brexit has become more binary: the risk of a soft Brexit has risen, but so has that of a crash Brexit. David Folkerts-Landau, Group Chief Economist Key pages this month: P6 Mixed signals P8 Oil less a concern for risk assets P11 Flat US yield curve but low risk of recession P17 Europe political risk not materialising P23 Limited scope for further oil weakness You can access a two-page update of Deutsche Bank Research's views on g [more]

More documents contained in "The House View - Snapshot"

37 Documents
April 22, 2022
2
The storm clouds over the global economy have darkened dramatically. Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has led to fundamental questions about Europe’s dependence on Russian energy and the continent’s geopolitical stability. It has also significantly pushed up commodity prices, exacerbating above-target inflation, and creating a serious risk that longer-term expectations become unanchored. [more]
January 13, 2022
3
As we arrive in 2022, there are plenty of storm clouds on the horizon to grapple with: inflation rates in the major economies remain well above target and well above what the forecasting community expected last year; aggregate demand remains elevated; global supply-chains are still clogged; the Covid-19 pandemic continues to fester; and the geopolitical climate is also darkening. The odds of an accident have risen and the likelihood of a soft landing in 2022 requires some favourable assumptions and a modicum of good luck. [more]
November 11, 2021
4
The short-term growth outlook has weakened amidst supply-chain issues and an energy shock that has boosted inflation. But there is still major fiscal support, whilst vaccines and other medicines will help against Covid.

If inflation proves even higher than anticipated, that could lead to tighter monetary policy that knocks growth off course. [more]
September 9, 2021
5
The global economy performed strongly over the summer, but the delta variant has led to increasingly frequent data misses versus expectations. This has seen us downgrade our near-term US growth outlook just as high inflation readings have shifted attention to when central banks will taper asset purchases. These inflation fears initially centred on the US, but the Euro Area now has its highest inflation in almost a decade as well. For now investors are still convinced, as is priced in, that inflation will be a temporary phenomenon that will mostly self-correct.  [more]
November 25, 2020
9
The global economic outlook has improved since September thanks to the positive vaccine news, and we now see global GDP returning to its pre-virus levels in Q2 2021. Significant risks around this forecast remain both to the downside (if the virus were to spread more severely this winter or a vaccine rollout were delayed) and the upside (if a vaccine rollout is quicker than anticipated). [more]
September 24, 2020
10
Over the summer months, the outlook for the global economy and financial markets has brightened. As such, we now see the global economy contracting by a smaller -3.9% this year, with global activity returning to its pre-virus level by the second half of next year, albeit with the major developed countries likely to take several more quarters to reach the same point. [more]
31.2.4