1. Research
  2. Produkte & Themen
  3. Publikationsreihen
  4. Aktueller Kommentar
21. August 2015
Region:
Nach buchstäblich sieben mageren Jahren ist die Erholung der europäischen Bankenbranche von der Finanzkrise mittlerweile in vollem Gange. Die Gewinne liegen auf dem höchsten Stand seit 2007, die Erträge steigen durch die Bank weg (auch aufgrund günstiger Wechselkursentwicklungen) und die Kreditverluste gehen zurück. Auch die Bilanzsummen der Banken wachsen. Die Kapitalquoten sind im Durchschnitt deutlich höher als die Anforderungen unter Basel III. Allerdings hat die Unsicherheit angesichts möglicher weiterer regulatorischer Verschärfungen („Basel IV“) zuletzt zugenommen (nur auf Englisch verfügbar). [mehr]
Es scheint wieder die Sonne: Der Aufschwung der europäischen Banken Seite 1 von 2 Aktueller Kommentar Es scheint wieder die Sonne: Der Aufschwung der europäischen Banken 21. August 2015 Nach buchstäblich sieben mageren Jahren ist die Erholung der europäischen Bankenbranche von der Finanzkrise mittlerweile in vollem Gange. Die Gewinne liegen auf dem höchsten Stand seit 2007, die Erträge steigen durch die Bank weg (auch aufgrund günstiger Wechselkursentwicklungen) und die Kreditverluste gehen zurück. Auch die Bilanzsummen der Banken wachsen. Die Kapitalquoten sind im Durchschnitt deutlich höher als die Anforderungen unter Basel III. Allerdings hat die Unsicherheit angesichts möglicher weiterer regulatorischer Verschärfungen („Basel IV“) zuletzt zugenommen (nur auf Englisch verfügbar). The recovery of European banks from seven lean years following the financial crisis finally seems to be in full swing. Net income of the 22 largest institutions reached almost EUR 50 bn in the first half of the year, the highest such figure since 2007. Improvements can be seen almost across the board: both net interest income and fees and commissions climbed 10% yoy in EUR terms, though this was partly driven by the heavy depreciation of the euro (down 19% versus the dollar) which boosted non-European earnings. Trading income surged by one-third on the back of increased market volatility and a very weak prior-year result. As a consequence, total revenues jumped by a staggering 15% to EUR 257 bn. Likewise, loan loss provisions, for many years a real drag on the P&L, fell 15% to just EUR 21 bn, their lowest level since 2007. Both total and risk-weighted assets grew (by 7% and 4.5%, respectively) but total equity expanded faster, at 13%, as banks increasingly issued Additional Tier 1 instruments to comply with Basel III requirements. For the EU banking sector as a whole, i.e. including small and mid- sized banks, balance sheet totals went up by only 3% yoy which i) testifies to the exchange rate effect on non-European operations and ii) indicates that smaller banks potentially still have a greater need to rebalance than larger institutions in light of stricter regulation. From a client perspective, lending to the private sector is recovering very slowly, with loans to households in the euro area currently up 1.3% yoy and corporate lending essentially flat. Weaknesses in large banks’ H1 results are harder to spot: first, operating expenses expanded by 12% yoy but, importantly, at a slower pace than revenues. Second, the strengthening of capital ratios is progressing, but not without bumps along the road – a relatively poor Q1 2015 was followed by a better Q2. The transitional Basel III Common Equity Tier 1 (CET1) ratio is now 12.9% on average, while the fully loaded ratio has reached 11.9%, an increase of 0.6 pp from June 2014. Considering the current discussion about a further tightening of capital requirements – the watchword is “Basel IV” – this will almost certainly not be the end of the story. And third, litigation costs remain high for several institutions, mostly those that are capital market oriented. Nevertheless, large European banks all in all have become increasingly profitable again. One in two have been able to report a post-tax return on equity of above 9% for the first six months of the year. The average improved by more than 2 pp versus H1 2014. Granted, many banks are not yet in a sustainable position again, but they are clearly moving in the right direction. Roughly speaking, the industry may be about four to five years behind its US counterpart (broadly in line with the overall economic cycle), and judging from the developments on that side of the pond, the outlook for the European banking system is relatively promising. Unless there are major hiccups from a renewed European crisis or other potential market turmoil, the seven lean years after the financial crisis Aktueller Kommentar Seite 2 von 2 may have finally come to an end. Along with that comes a gradual re-privatisation of banks that were bailed out by taxpayers during the crisis and in which a number of governments still hold substantial stakes.       Autor: Jan Schildbach (+49) 69 910-31717 mehr zum Research-Bereich Banken, Finanzmärkte und Regulierung Aktuelle Kommentare - Archiv     © Copyright 2015. Deutsche Bank AG, Deutsche Bank Research, 60262 Frankfurt am Main, Deutschland. Alle Rechte vorbehalten. Bei Zitaten wird um Quellenangabe „Deutsche Bank Research“ gebeten. Die vorstehenden Angaben stellen keine Anlage-, Rechts- oder Steuerberatung dar. Alle Meinungsaussagen geben die aktuelle Einschätzung des Verfassers wieder, die nicht notwendigerweise der Meinung der Deutsche Bank AG oder ihrer assoziierten Unternehmen entspricht. Alle Meinungen können ohne vorherige Ankündigung geändert werden. Die Meinungen können von Einschätzungen abweichen, die in anderen von der Deutsche Bank veröffentlichten Dokumenten, einschließlich Research-Veröffentlichungen, vertreten werden. Die vorstehenden Angaben werden nur zu Informationszwecken und ohne vertragliche oder sonstige Verpflichtung zur Verfügung gestellt. Für die Richtigkeit, Vollständigkeit oder Angemessenheit der vorstehenden Angaben oder Einschätzungen wird keine Gewähr übernommen. In Deutschland wird dieser Bericht von Deutsche Bank AG Frankfurt genehmigt und/oder verbreitet, die über eine Erlaubnis zur Erbringung von Bankgeschäften und Finanzdienstleistungen verfügt und unter der Aufsicht der Europäischen Zentralbank (EZB) und der Bundesanstalt für Finanzdienstleistungsaufsicht (BaFin) steht. Im Vereinigten Königreich wird dieser Bericht durch Deutsche Bank AG, Filiale London, Mitglied der London Stock Exchange, genehmigt und/oder verbreitet, die von der UK Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA) zugelassen wurde und der eingeschränkten Aufsicht der Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) (unter der Nummer 150018) sowie der PRA unterliegt. In Hongkong wird dieser Bericht durch Deutsche Bank AG, Hong Kong Branch, in Korea durch Deutsche Securities Korea Co. und in Singapur durch Deutsche Bank AG, Singapore Branch, verbreitet. In Japan wird dieser Bericht durch Deutsche Securities Limited, Tokyo Branch, genehmigt und/oder verbreitet. In Australien sollten Privatkunden eine Kopie der betreffenden Produktinformation (Product Disclosure Statement oder PDS) zu jeglichem in diesem Bericht erwähnten Finanzinstrument beziehen und dieses PDS berücksichtigen, bevor sie eine Anlageentscheidung treffen.
2.4.6